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Xinhua News Agency, Canberra, September 16

Update:21-09-2018
Summary:

Xinhua News Agency, Canberra, September 16 (Reporter Ba […]

Xinhua News Agency, Canberra, September 16 (Reporter Bai Xu) A new study released by the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization of Australia shows that the more turtles ingest plastics, the higher the risk of death, and the pollution of marine plastics is threatening the survival of turtles.

      Previous studies have found that seven species of sea turtles around the world have swallowed plastics. It is estimated that 52% of the world's turtles have swallowed plastic. But scientists still don't know whether swallowing plastic is the main cause of turtle death.

      Researchers from the Commonwealth Scientific and plastic pallet mould Industrial Research Institute of Australia dissected 1,000 dead sea turtles that had been washed onto Australian beaches and quantified the relationship between turtle death and swallowing plastics. The results show that once the turtles swallow 14 plastics, the risk of death can reach 50%.

      The researchers said that this does not mean that turtles will not die if they eat less than 14 pieces of plastic. In the study, some dead sea turtles only swallowed a piece of plastic. One of the turtles died in the intestines and was pierced by hard plastic. The other died of swallowing soft plastics and causing intestinal obstruction.

      Chris Wilcox, chief scientist of the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, said: "We found that when turtles eat the first piece of plastic, the risk of death can reach 22%. As they eat more plastic, The risk of death has also increased."

      The researchers found that some turtles swallowed hundreds of plastics, and the turtles found traces of film, rope, fishing lines, stickers, soft plastics and other debris.

     “There are millions of tons of plastic debris flowing into the ocean every year,” Wilcox said. “This study helps us understand how plastic pollution affects marine species so that we can better develop solutions.”

     Related research has been published in the new issue of the British "Nature"